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PITTSBURGH MIND-BODY CENTER ~ VISITING SCHOLARS PROGRAM
  • June 12, 2007
  • Schenley I-III, Holiday Inn Select - University Center

  • 100 Lytton Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA   15213
    Presentation 1: 9:30-10:30am

    Sheldon Cohen, PhD
    Robert E. Doherty
    Professor of Psychology,
    Carnegie Mellon University
    "Social Relationships and Health"

    Three variables will be discussed -- social integration,
    social support, and negative interaction.  Each characterizes
    a different aspect of our social relationships.  I will argue that
    each is associated with our health and well-being; that each
    influences health through different mechanisms; and that
    associations between these variables and health are not
    spurious findings attributable to our personalities.  I will also
    address marriage as a special case whose effects on health
    partly reflect integration, support and negative interactions.
    .
    . Click here to Download the PowerPoint Slides . . . View PowerPoint Slideshow
    . Click here to Download or Listen to the Audio portion of the presentation . . . Listen to Audio (MP3 File, 42 minutes, 21MB)
    .

    .
    Presentation 2: 10:45-11:45 am

    Steven R. Asher, PhD
    Professor of Psychology &
    Neuroscience, Duke University
    "The Social Tasks of Friendship"

    Our work involves making a distinction between children's
    acceptance by peers versus children's participation in close
    friendships.  Both acceptance and friendship play a role in
    children's emotional well being (e.g., loneliness) and school
    adjustment. After briefly discussing this background, I will
    describe a proposed taxonomy of the social tasks children
    and adults face in making and keeping friends.  The empirical
    work I will describe next focuses on some of these friendship
    tasks: how children and college students respond to conflicts
    of interests in friendship, how children respond to the
    challenges of giving and receiving help, and how children and
    college students respond to the challenges that they face
    when friends disappoint (e.g., violate widely held friendship
    expectations). Responding effectively to these tasks involves
    not just an effective behavioral repertoire (social skills), but
    having adaptive beliefs and understandings about friendship,
    making relationship promoting interpretations of other
    peoples' behavior in conflict of interest situations, and having
    adaptive relationship goals in specific social situations.
    The presentation will conclude by discussing the need for
    intervention research on friendship competencies.
    .
    . Click here to Download the PowerPoint Slides . . . View PowerPoint Slideshow
    . Click here to Download or Listen to the Audio portion of the presentation . . . Listen to Audio (MP3 File, 64 minutes, 31MB)
    .

    Presentation 3: 1:00-2:00 pm

    Nicki Crick, PhD
    Director, Institute of
    Child Development
    Distinguished McKnight University Professor, University of Minnesota

    Ice-Cream Movie
    (MOV File, 6 minutes, 66MB)
    "The Development of Childhood Aggression:
          Boys Will Be Boys, But What About Girls?"

    A definition and examples of relational aggression as well
    as an overview of available theory and research on the
    antecedents, correlates, and outcomes associated with
    these types of hostile behaviors will be provided.

    Topics to be covered include:
    1) gender differences
    2) friendships
    3) antipathies
    4) romantic relationships
    5) parent-child relationships
    6) sibling relationships
    7) social-information processing patterns
    8) social-psychological adjustment; and
    9) heritability
     
    . Click here to Download the PowerPoint Slides . . . View PowerPoint Slideshow
    . Click here to Download or Listen to the Audio portion of the presentation . . . Listen to Audio (MP3 File, 52 minutes, 26MB)

    Presentation 4: 2:15-3:15 pm

    W. Andrew Collins, PhD
    Morse-Alumni Distinguished Teaching Professor of Child Psychology
    University of Minnesota
    "The Long Arm of Childhood Relationships:
        Longitudinal-Developmental Perspectives on
               Dating and Partnering"

    Close relationships are a primary context for human
    development that changes from infancy to adulthood in
    content and significance.  This talk will address the
    growing body of evidence that adult relationships are rooted
    in earlier relationships with both family members and peers.
    Drawing from research on 180 individuals followed from
    birth to age 30, I will illustrate the relevance of a
    longitudinal-developmental perspective in accounting for
    satisfaction, stability, subjective emotional experiences,
    and conflict resolution in dating and partnered couples along
    with implications for physical health and well being of the
    partners.
    .
    . Click here to Download the PowerPoint Slides . . . View PowerPoint Slideshow
    . Click here to Download or Listen to the Audio portion of the presentation . . . Listen to Audio (MP3 File, 62 minutes, 31MB)

    Presentation 5: 3:30-4:30 pm

    Jeffry A. Simpson, PhD
    Professor of Psychology,
    University of Minnesota
    "Working Models of Attachment and Reactions
           to Different Types of Caregiving"

    Inspired by attachment theory, we tested a series of
    theoretically-derived predictions about connections between
    attachment working models (attachment to one’s parents
    assessed by the Adult Attachment Interview; AAI) and the
    effectiveness of specific types of caregiving spontaneously
    displayed by dating partners during a stressful conflict
    resolution discussion. Each partner first completed the AAI.
    One week later, each couple was videotaped while they tried
    to resolve a current problem in their relationship. Trained
    observers then rated each interaction for the degree to which:
    (a) emotional, instrumental, and physical caregiving behaviors
    were displayed, (b) care recipients appeared calmed by their
    partners’ caregiving attempts, and (c) each partner appeared
    distressed during the discussion. Individuals who had more
    secure representations of their parents were rated as being
    more calmed if/when their partners provided greater emotional
    care, especially if they were rated as more distressed.
    Conversely, individuals who had more insecure (dismissive)
    representations of their parents reacted more favorably to
    instrumental caregiving behaviors from their partners,
    especially if they were more distressed. The broader
    theoretical and applied implications of these findings will
    be discussed.
    .
    . Click here to Download the PowerPoint Slides . . . View PowerPoint Slideshow
    . Click here to Download or Listen to the Audio portion of the presentation . . . Listen to Audio (MP3 File, 37 minutes, 18MB)


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